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Squirting 101: Myths & Truths About Female Ejaculation

Squirting 101: Myths & Truths About Female Ejaculation

Written by Yoppie

04 Jun 2021

So you’re saying vaginas actually ejaculate? 

What?! I thought squirting was a myth...

What comes out? 

Where does it come from?

What does squirting look like?

How common is it? 

Can I control it? 

What if I can’t squirt? 

Isn’t it embarrassing? 

Let’s get into the juicy stuff (erm, pardon the pun). We’re talking female ejaculation; what is it, how does it happen, what does it look like, can you control it, and all that jizz jazz. Whether you’re a squirter, or you’re just curious about what’s going on down there, we have all the details right here...

So you’re saying vaginas actually ejaculate? 

Though not nearly as common as male ejaculation, female ejaculation is when the urethra expels some fluid during arousal - and don’t worry, you don’t have to identify as female to enjoy this phenomenon. 

Contrary to popular belief, it’s not always the same as having an orgasm, so it’s somewhat of a mystery. There’s not much research out there about female ejaculation or the biological reasons why it might happen, but rest assured, it’s totally OK and normal if it happens to you. 

What?! I thought squirting was a myth...

Nope, it can actually happen! 

What comes out? 

For a long time it was thought that female ejaculation was simply a continence issue, since the fluid is expelled via the urethra (the part where pee comes out), but research has since disproved this. 

A 2014 study found that fluid accumulates in the bladder during arousal and leaves through the urethra during ejaculation, confirmed via an ultrasound of the subjects’ bladders. At first the scan showed that the bladder was empty, then it filled during arousal, and appeared empty again after ejaculation. From what scientists now know, there are two different types of female ejaculate; squirting fluid, which is typically colourless, odourless, and there can be a lot of it, and ejaculate fluid, which is thick and milky, more like male semen. 

Both contain fructose, a type of sugar, and prostatic acid phosphatase (PSA), which is the same enzyme found in semen that helps sperm motility. 

Where does it come from?

Scientists believe that the PSA and fructose come from the Skene’s glands, sometimes called Gartner’s duct, or the female prostate. These glands can be found close to the G-spot, which is why it’s thought that stimulation of this area can cause the glands to produce PSA and fructose, which moves to the urethra and is then expelled. 

What does squirting look like?

It looks different for everyone; you may not know it’s happening, or you may experience a sort of ‘spurt’ of liquid, or even a sensation that feels like gushing. Some people report that it looks like they have wet the bed, so it’s possible for there to be quite a bit of fluid. It is estimated that between 30 and 150 milliliters are expelled during female ejaculation. 

How common is it? 

The International Society for Sexual Medicine estimates that 10-50% of women ejaculate during sex. That’s a pretty big margin of error, so it’s safe to say researchers still don’t know a whole lot about this phenomenon. 

Can I control it? 

If you already experience female ejaculation, whether sometimes or on a regular basis, good on you! If you’re curious about it and you want to try it out for yourself or on a partner, you may find it’s simply luck of the draw - some can do it, some can’t. Still, there’s no harm in giving it a try! 

Experts say concentrating on stimulating the G-spot is the most likely cause of squirting, and being in a comfortable, relaxed state will help too. Some say it can feel like needing to pee before squirting, so it’s best to pee before sex so you’re not afraid to bear down (another tip) when you feel ready to go. As with many things in life, if at first you don’t succeed, try again! 

What if I can’t squirt? 

Not a problem. If porn had its way, we’d all believe that squirting was the ultimate satisfaction and turn-on, but that’s just not the case. Some people like the idea, others don’t. Some people find it sexy, others don’t. It’s a personal thing, so don’t worry if your body won’t play ball - the sexual pleasure of you and your partner isn’t dependent on it.  

Isn’t it embarrassing? 

Absolutely not. It can feel a bit overwhelming if there’s a lot of liquid involved, plus you might worry that you have simply weed yourself during sex! It’s understandable to be a little taken aback, but there’s nothing to be ashamed about. Enjoy the feeling if you can, and if you’re worried about it happening while having sex with a partner, communicate your worries with them. And remember, penises do it all the time, so let your vagina do its thing! 

Are you a proud squirter? A reluctant one? Or maybe you’re just curious to try it for yourself? You can ask any questions you have over in our private Facebook group, or drop us a note on Insta @itsyoppie. Don't forget that our personalised period box can get organic tampons, pads, liners (and more!) delivered easily and regularly through your letterbox. That frees up some headspace for thinking about more...fun things!

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